de en

Artists Who Risk Their Lives

Since 2013, the non-profit organization Artist at Risk has made it its mission to support persecuted artists and cultural producers, facilitating their safe passage from their countries of origin. They have assisted numerous persecuted and imprisoned artists. Lerchenfeld spoke to the two founders and directors Marita Muukkonen and Ivor Stodolsky.

Lerchenfeld: What was your motivation for founding Artist at Risk (AR) in 2013? Was there a key moment, a special event that moved you to found the organization?

Ivor Stodolsky: Between 2011 and 2013 we were curating the Re-Aligned project, which presented rebellious and revolutionary movements by artists from around the world. We presented artists who were part of the Egyptian revolution, who were involved in Occupy Wall Street in New York, or in protests in Spain. In 2013 we were just doing our work with programs that involved residencies from different countries when we realized that there is no way that some of these artists can go back. That really was a turning point for us. That is why we have developed a program that offers artists a safe haven.

Marita Muukkonen: At that time, we had no knowledge about a program that was mainly focusing on professional artists or people working in the art field. There are programs for journalists and authors that have a long history and are well established. But in 2013 there was no organization or program that was dedicated to visual artists who had to leave their country. It was and is important to us that they can come as artists, not as refugees or asylum seekers. We want them to work in their professional context, where they can come into contact with colleagues and audiences. They have residencies at museums or other art institutions. We are working with high-profile artists who are risking their lives. They have to be treated accordingly. And this is our driving force. It’s a privilege to work with them.

IS: They are human rights activists, not only artists. Even though they express themselves through the media of art, they do a lot for their local communities and not just for themselves or for the sake of being a controversial artist. They don’t want to be famous artists, but they are becoming known around the world for their incredibly important work, their courage. They are productive, incredibly talented people.

Lf.: How does the application process work? How does someone apply for an Artist at Risk residency?

MM: Artists can apply through our website. First, they do a risk assessment, because we have to evaluate if the risk is real. And of course, there are artists who are more at risk than others and fear they will be murdered or tortured. Then we verify that they are professional artists, and then we have to find the right institution for them. If they are coming with a family, we have to look for an institution that can host a family. We also look at their language skills. Many come to the EU, but sometimes it is also possible to bring the artist to a partner institution in a neighboring country that is safe. There are many factors we have to consider. And of course, the biggest problem for artists entering the EU is getting a visa. A lot of our energy goes toward starting the visa process.

Lf.: How big is your team to organize all that? How many people are working with you?

IS: We have an office in Helsinki and one in Berlin. The people at AR mostly work online. And we have a broad network of solidarity teams who match the applicants with the right host institution. They find out everything about the needs and requirements of the artists as well es the institutions. We have set up the solidarity teams according to different regions. Currently there are solidarity teams that take care of applicants from Ukraine, Russia, Belarus, Afghanistan, and the Arabic-speaking world. But in addition to the AR offices and the solidarity teams, there are of course also numerous employees at the partner institutions who are involved in the process: residency coordinators, people who curate shows and organize the production of works, cleaners, and many more.

MM: At the moment we have a massive number of applications from Afghanistan, Ukraine, and Russia. There are 450 artists at risk in Afghanistan. We have 1,000 applicants from Ukraine, and many Russian dissidents are also applying. But we cannot forget the rest of the world. We are looking for more host organizations, especially in Germany. To this end, we recently started a new partnership with the Goethe Institut. Institutions that are interested and have the ability to host artists at risk can apply via our website. So if there are institutions also in Hamburg that are considering joining our network, it would be great if they would apply.

Lf.: What are the special requirements for institutions to become a host institution?

IS: We need to screen the institutions to make sure that they meet certain minimum standards. They have to show us the accommodations they provide. But they also have to represent certain ethical values and principles.

MM: Currently we are witnessing great solidarity in hosting Ukrainian artists. Many institutions are accepting Ukrainian artists and cultural producers. We hope that they will remain with us in the network over the long term and that they will also accept artists from other countries in the future.

Lf.: Is the resistant role of artists in current conflicts or wars in their home countries still romanticized too much by the Western art scene? Is the image of the struggling artist changing?

MM: There is nothing romantic about hiding in a basement or safe house. You can’t practice your art, you can’t work in a situation like that. If you are a musician, a painter, or a filmmaker, basically you can’t work. People are risking their lives, they are being tortured, executed. They can no longer be artists. They are targeted as a social group, and it really feels criminal that they are left behind, as is the case in Afghanistan right now. The EU and Western countries have not done enough to help these people. As we are speaking, we still hope that the German government will offer visas for art producers at risk.

IS: I think the image of persecuted artists has changed a lot. Maybe in the past, during the Cold War, there was a romantic image of the repressed writer living underground and writing against the regime. Today, however, the situation for endangered artists is quite different. They are no longer respected for their work. People want to get rid of them, to silence them. The reality that people live in is very different to former times. Many persecuted artists today also no longer come from the “classical” disciplines. They are visual artists, performance artists, or popular musicians who are no longer allowed to perform in their home countries. An example is the Somali musician Lil Baliil. He has been targeted by militant groups who view his music as a threat to Somali culture. Following death threats, he is currently an Artists at Risk resident in Berlin. It may well be that there is a tendency in the West to romanticize the image of the persecuted artist. But perhaps to take something positive away from this: sometimes it takes a little “glamor” to shed more light on artists who otherwise remain invisible. But when you look at the people risking their lives and what they tell us about it, it is not glamorous at all. For example, if you read the prison diary of Pussy Riot member Maria Alyokhina, it’s horrifying what she went through. There is nothing glamorous about it. It’s shocking reality.

MM: And there is another aspect that we should not forget. If you have worked as a political artist and had to leave your country, then life in another place is safe and you are protected, but at the same time you can no longer intervene with your art in the familiar environment. This is also difficult for many artists.

Lf.: You use very specific terms on your website and in your interviews and avoid others. For example, you don’t use terms like “refugee artist.” How important is language to you in this context?

IS: We want to treat the artists as artists, and not label them as “refugee artists,” because a certain idea is also conveyed through language. We do not want Syrian curators living in Berlin to be “allowed” to present only Syrian artists. There are these expectations, and we want to consciously undermine them. We use the French terms like “Immigré Artist” or “Exilé Artist“.

Lf.: In mid-February, together with the ZKM Karlsruhe, you organized the online conference “Institutions and Resistance: Alliances for Art at Risk”, where numerous artists at risk as well as theoreticians and partner institutions spoke. Two weeks later, Russia’s war against Ukraine began. What has changed for you and your work since then?

MM: We could not foresee then what would happen a few days later in Ukraine. Currently, there is a great sense of solidarity. The alliances are growing. We very much hope that these ties will continue beyond this, because we face many other crises. We need strong institutional power to bring about political change—for example, on the issue of humanitarian visas.

VS: The cooperation and alliances are growing. There are new networks in Sweden, Spain, and northern Italy. And we are working with the Goethe-Institut, as we mentioned earlier. Something like a pan-European network is forming. And for the first time in its history, UNESCO is funding projects by and with living people, and not just protecting stone cultural assets or monuments.

Lf.: What would you like EU policymakers to do? How could they make your work easier?

IS: That is easy to answer: humanitarian visas at the European level would help. These are visas that could be issued on humanitarian grounds by a national embassy abroad. They allow third-country nationals to apply for entry into the Schengen area on humanitarian reasons. If we let the Ukrainian people stay and work in the EU for a year or two, it would be great if this could also be possible for other people—for example, from Afghanistan. It is shocking to see how comparatively few people from Afghanistan are currently turning to the EU in search of help, and yet finding no admission. The same goes for other crisis regions. We must not forget that when we help people, especially artists in need, they not only enrich our lives and our culture. They also go back to their home countries strengthened and support their local societies.

This text was published first in Lerchenfeld #62. The online conversation was conducted by Beate Anspach on June 13, 2022.

For more information: https://artistsatrisk.org/

ASA Open Studios im Wintersemester 2021/22; Foto: Marie-Theres Böhmker

ASA Open Studios im Wintersemester 2021/22; Foto: Marie-Theres Böhmker

Das Beste kommt zum Schluss

Zum Jahresende finden nochmals zahlreiche Ausstellungen und Veranstaltungen mit HFBK-Kontext statt. Einige davon tragen wir hier zusammen. Auch einen kurzen Ausblick auf zwei Vorträge im Rahmen des Professionalisierungsprogramms im Januar finden sich in darunter.

Non-Knowledge, Laughter and the Moving Image, Grafik: Leon Lothschütz

Non-Knowledge, Laughter and the Moving Image, Grafik: Leon Lothschütz

Festival und Symposium: Non-Knowledge, Laughter and the Moving Image

Als abschließender Teil des künstlerischen Forschungsprojekts laden das Festival und Symposium vom 24.-27. November 2022 zu Vorführungen, Performances, Vorträgen und Diskussionen ein, die das Potenzial der bewegten Bilder und des (menschlichen und nicht-menschlichen) Körpers erforschen, unseren gewohnten Kurs umzukehren und die herrschende Ordnung der Dinge zu verändern.

Blick in die vollbesetzte Aula zum Semesterstart; Foto: Lukas Engelhardt

Blick in die vollbesetzte Aula zum Semesterstart; Foto: Lukas Engelhardt

Herzlich willkommen - und los geht's!

Wir freuen uns, zum Wintersemester 2022/23 viele neue Gesichter an der HFBK Hamburg begrüßen zu können. Einige Informationen und Hintergründe zu unseren neuen Professor*innen und Gastprofessor*innen stellen wir hier zusammen.

Einzelausstellung von Konstantin Grcic

Vom 29. September bis 23. Oktober 2022 zeigt Konstantin Grcic (Professor für Industriedesign) im ICAT - Institute for Contemporary Art & Transfer der HFBK Hamburg eine raumgreifende Installation aus von ihm gestalteten Objekten und bereits existierenden, neu zusammengestellten Gegenständen. Parallel wird der von ihm konzipierte Raum für Workshops, Seminare und Büro-Arbeitsplätze im AtelierHaus in Betrieb genommen.

Amna Elhassan, Tea Lady, Öl auf Leinwand, 100 x 100 cm

Amna Elhassan, Tea Lady, Öl auf Leinwand, 100 x 100 cm

Kunst und Krieg

„Jeder Künstler ist ein Mensch“. Diese so zutreffende wie existenzialistische Feststellung von Martin Kippenberger (in ironischer Umformulierung des bekannten Beuys Zitats) bringt es in vielerlei Hinsicht auf den Punkt. Zum einen erinnert sie uns daran, nicht wegzusehen, (künstlerisch) aktiv zu handeln und unsere Stimmen zu erheben. Gleichzeitig ist sie eine Ermahnung, denen zu helfen, die in Not sind. Und das sind im Moment sehr viele Menschen, unter ihnen zahlreiche Künstler*innen. Deshalb ist es für Kunstinstitutionen wichtig, nicht nur über Kunst, sondern auch über Politik zu diskutieren.

Merlin Reichert, Die Alltäglichkeit des Untergangs, Installation in der Galerie der HFBK; Foto: Tim Albrecht

Merlin Reichert, Die Alltäglichkeit des Untergangs, Installation in der Galerie der HFBK; Foto: Tim Albrecht

Graduate Show 2022: We’ve Only Just Begun

Vom 8. bis 10. Juli 2022 präsentieren mehr als 160 Bachelor- und Master-Absolvent*innen des Jahrgangs 2021/22 ihre Abschlussarbeiten aus allen Studienschwerpunkten. Unter dem Titel Final Cut laufen zudem alle Abschlussfilme auf großer Leinwand in der Aula der HFBK Hamburg. Parallel ist in der Galerie der HFBK im Atelierhaus die Ausstellung der sudanesischen Gastlektorin Amna Elhassan zu sehen.

Grafik: Nele Willert, Dennise Salinas

Grafik: Nele Willert, Dennise Salinas

Der Juni lockt mit Kunst und Theorie

So viel Programm war schon lange nicht mehr: Ein dreitägiger Kongress zur Visualität des Internets bringt internationale Webdesigner*innen zusammen; das Forscher*innenkollektiv freethought diskutiert über die Rolle von Infrastrukturen und das Symposium zum Abschied der Professorin Michaela Ott greift zentrale Fragen ihrer Forschungstätigkeit auf.

Renée Green. ED/HF, 2017. Film still. Courtesy of the artist, Free Agent Media, Bortolami Gallery, New York, and Galerie Nagel Draxler, Berlin/Cologne/Munich.

Renée Green. ED/HF, 2017. Film still. Courtesy of the artist, Free Agent Media, Bortolami Gallery, New York, and Galerie Nagel Draxler, Berlin/Cologne/Munich.

Finkenwerder Kunstpreis 2022

Der 1999 vom Kulturkreis Finkenwerder e.V. initiierte Finkenwerder Kunstpreis hat eine Neuausrichtung erfahren: Als neuer Partner erweitert die HFBK Hamburg den Preis um den Aspekt der künstlerischen Nachwuchsförderung und richtet ab 2022 die Ausstellung der Prämierten in der HFBK Galerie aus. Mit dem diesjährigen Finkenwerder Kunstpreis wird die US-amerikanische Künstlein Renée Green ausgezeichnet. Die HFBK-Absolventin Frieda Toranzo Jaeger erhält den Finkenwerder Förderpreis der HFBK Hamburg.

Amanda F. Koch-Nielsen, Motherslugger; Foto: Lukas Engelhardt

Amanda F. Koch-Nielsen, Motherslugger; Foto: Lukas Engelhardt

Nachhaltigkeit im Kontext von Kunst und Kunsthochschule

Im Bewusstsein einer ausstehenden fundamentalen gesellschaftlichen Transformation und der nicht unwesentlichen Schrittmacherfunktion, die einem Ort der künstlerischen Forschung und Produktion hierbei womöglich zukommt, hat sich die HFBK Hamburg auf den Weg gemacht, das Thema strategisch wie konkret pragmatisch für die Hochschule zu entwickeln. Denn wer, wenn nicht die Künstler*innen sind in ihrer täglichen Arbeit damit befasst, das Gegebene zu hinterfragen, genau hinzuschauen, neue Möglichkeiten, wie die Welt sein könnte, zu erkennen und durchzuspielen, einem anderen Wissen Gestalt zu geben

Atelier-Neubau in der Häuserflucht am Lerchenfeld

Atelier-Neubau in der Häuserflucht am Lerchenfeld, im Hintergrund der Bau von Fritz Schumacher; Foto: Tim Albrecht

Raum für die Kunst

Nach mehr als 40 Jahren intensiven Bemühens wird für die HFBK Hamburg ein lang gehegter Traum Wirklichkeit. Mit dem neu eröffneten Ateliergebäude erhalten die Studienschwerpunkte Malerei/Zeichnen, Bildhauerei und Zeitbezogene Medien endlich die dringend benötigten Atelierräume für Master-Studierende. Es braucht einfach Raum für eigene Ideen, zum Denken, für Kunstproduktion, Ausstellungen und als Depot.

Martha Szymkowiak / Emilia Bongilaj, Installation “Mmh”; Foto: Tim Albrecht

Martha Szymkowiak / Emilia Bongilaj, Installation “Mmh”; Foto: Tim Albrecht

Jahresausstellung 2022 an der HFBK Hamburg

Nach der digitalen Ausgabe im letzten Jahr, findet die Jahresausstellung 2022 an der HFBK Hamburg wieder mit Publikum statt. Vom 11.-13. Februar präsentieren die Studierenden aus allen Studienschwerpunkten ihre künstlerischen Arbeiten im Gebäude am Lerchenfeld, in der Wartenau 15 und im neu eröffneten Atelierhaus.

Annette Wehrmann, photography from the series Blumensprengungen, 1991-95; Foto: Ort des Gegen e.V., VG-Bild Kunst Bonn

Annette Wehrmann, photography from the series Blumensprengungen, 1991-95; Foto: Ort des Gegen e.V., VG-Bild Kunst Bonn

Conference: Counter-Monuments and Para-Monuments

The international conference at HFBK Hamburg on December 2-4, 2021 – jointly conceived by Nora Sternfeld and Michaela Melián –, is dedicated to the history of artistic counter-monuments and forms of protest, discusses aesthetics of memory and historical manifestations in public space, and asks about para-monuments for the present.

23 Fragen des Institutional Questionaire, grafisch umgesetzt von Ran Altamirano auf den Türgläsern der HFBK Hamburg zur Jahresausstellung 2021; Foto: Charlotte Spiegelfeld

23 Fragen des Institutional Questionaire, grafisch umgesetzt von Ran Altamirano auf den Türgläsern der HFBK Hamburg zur Jahresausstellung 2021; Foto: Charlotte Spiegelfeld

Diversity

Wer spricht? Wer malt welches Motiv? Wer wird gezeigt, wer nicht? Identitätspolitische Fragen spielen in der Kunst und damit auch an der HFBK Hamburg eine wichtige Rolle. Das hochschuleigene Lerchenfeld-Magazin beleuchtet in der aktuellen Ausgabe Hochschulstrukturen sowie Studierendeninitiativen, die sich mit Diversität und Identität befassen.

Grafik: Tim Ballaschke

Grafik: Tim Ballaschke

Semesterstart

Nach drei Semestern Hybrid-Lehre unter Pandemiebedingungen steht nun endlich wieder ein Präsenz-Semester bevor. Wir begrüßen alle neuen Studierenden und Lehrenden an der HFBK Hamburg und laden herzlich zur Eröffnung des akademischen Jahres 2020/21 ein, die in diesem Jahr von einem Gastvortrag von ruangrupa begleitet wird.

Foto: Klaus Frahm

Foto: Klaus Frahm

Summer Break

Die HFBK Hamburg befindet sich in der vorlesungsfreien Zeit, viele Studierende und Lehrende sind im Sommerurlaub, Kunstinstitutionen haben Sommerpause. Eine gute Gelegenheit zum vielfältigen Nach-Lesen und -Sehen:

ASA Open Studio 2019, Karolinenstraße 2a, Haus 5; Foto: Matthew Muir

ASA Open Studio 2019, Karolinenstraße 2a, Haus 5; Foto: Matthew Muir

Live und in Farbe: die ASA Open Studios im Juni 2021

Seit 2010 organisiert die HFBK das internationale Austauschprogramm Art School Alliance. Es ermöglicht HFBK-Studierenden ein Auslandssemester an renommierten Partnerhochschulen und lädt vice versa internationale Kunststudierende an die HFBK ein. Zum Ende ihres Hamburg-Aufenthalts stellen die Studierenden in den Open Studios in der Karolinenstraße aus, die nun auch wieder für das kunstinteressierte Publikum geöffnet sind.

Studiengruppe Prof. Dr. Anja Steidinger, Was animiert uns?, 2021, Mediathek der HFBK Hamburg, Filmstill

Studiengruppe Prof. Dr. Anja Steidinger, Was animiert uns?, 2021, Mediathek der HFBK Hamburg, Filmstill

Vermitteln und Verlernen: Wartenau Versammlungen

Die Kunstpädagogik Professorinnen Nora Sternfeld und Anja Steidinger haben das Format „Wartenau Versammlungen“ initiiert. Es oszilliert zwischen Kunst, Bildung, Forschung und Aktivismus. Ergänzend zu diesem offenen Handlungsraum gibt es nun auch eine eigene Website, die die Diskurse, Gespräche und Veranstaltungen begleitet.

Ausstellungsansicht "Schule der Folgenlosigkeit. Übungen für ein anderes Leben" im Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe Hamburg; Foto: Maximilian Schwarzmann

Ausstellungsansicht "Schule der Folgenlosigkeit. Übungen für ein anderes Leben" im Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe Hamburg; Foto: Maximilian Schwarzmann

Schule der Folgenlosigkeit

Alle reden über Folgen: Die Folgen des Klimawandels, der Corona-Pandemie oder der Digitalisierung. Friedrich von Borries (Professor für Designtheorie) dagegen widmet sich der Folgenlosigkeit. In der "Schule der Folgenlosigkeit. Übungen für ein anderes Leben" im Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe Hamburg verknüpft er Sammlungsobjekte mit einem eigens für die Ausstellung eingerichteten „Selbstlernraum“ so, dass eine neue Perspektive auf „Nachhaltigkeit“ entsteht und vermeintlich allgemeingültige Vorstellungen eines „richtigen Lebens“ hinterfragt werden.

Jahresausstellung 2021 der HFBK Hamburg

Jahresausstellung einmal anders: Vom 12.-14. Februar 2021 hatten die Studierenden der Hochschule für bildende Künste Hamburg dafür gemeinsam mit ihren Professor*innen eine Vielzahl von Präsentationsmöglichkeiten auf unterschiedlichen Kommunikationskanälen erschlossen. Die Formate reichten von gestreamten Live-Performances über Videoprogramme, Radiosendungen, eine Telefonhotline, Online-Konferenzen bis hin zu einem Webshop für Editionen. Darüber hinaus waren vereinzelte Interventionen im Außenraum der HFBK und in der Stadt zu entdecken.

Studieninformationstag 2021

Wie werde ich Kunststudent*in? Wie funktioniert das Bewerbungsverfahren? Kann ich an der HFBK auch auf Lehramt studieren? Diese und weitere Fragen rund um das Kunststudium beantworteten Professor*innen, Studierende und Mitarbeiter*innen der HFBK im Rahmen des Studieninformationstages am 13. Februar 2021. Zusätzlich findet am 23. Februar um 14 Uhr ein Termin speziell für englischsprachige Studieninteressierte statt.

Katja Pilipenko

Katja Pilipenko

Semestereröffnung und Hiscox-Preisverleihung 2020

Am Abend des 4. Novembers feierte die HFBK die Eröffnung des akademischen Jahres 2020/21 sowie die Verleihung des Hiscox-Kunstpreises im Livestream – offline mit genug Abstand und dennoch gemeinsam online.

Ausstellung Transparencies mit Arbeiten von Elena Crijnen, Annika Faescke, Svenja Frank, Francis Kussatz, Anne Meerpohl, Elisa Nessler, Julia Nordholz, Florentine Pahl, Cristina Rüesch, Janka Schubert, Wiebke Schwarzhans, Rosa Thiemer, Lea van Hall. Betreut von Prof. Verena Issel und Fabian Hesse; Foto: Screenshot

Ausstellung Transparencies mit Arbeiten von Elena Crijnen, Annika Faescke, Svenja Frank, Francis Kussatz, Anne Meerpohl, Elisa Nessler, Julia Nordholz, Florentine Pahl, Cristina Rüesch, Janka Schubert, Wiebke Schwarzhans, Rosa Thiemer, Lea van Hall. Betreut von Prof. Verena Issel und Fabian Hesse; Foto: Screenshot

Digitale Lehre an der HFBK

Wie die Hochschule die Besonderheiten der künstlerischen Lehre mit den Möglichkeiten des Digitalen verbindet.

Alltagsrealität oder Klischee?; Foto: Tim Albrecht

Alltagsrealität oder Klischee?; Foto: Tim Albrecht

Absolvent*innenstudie der HFBK

Kunst studieren – und was kommt danach? Die Klischeebilder halten sich standhaft: Wer Kunst studiert hat, wird entweder Taxifahrer, arbeitet in einer Bar oder heiratet reich. Aber wirklich von der Kunst leben könnten nur die wenigsten – erst Recht in Zeiten globaler Krisen. Die HFBK Hamburg wollte es genauer wissen und hat bei der Fakultät der Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften der Universität Hamburg eine breit angelegte Befragung ihrer Absolventinnen und Absolventen der letzten 15 Jahre in Auftrag gegeben.

Ausstellung Social Design, Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe Hamburg, Teilansicht; Foto: MKG Hamburg

Ausstellung Social Design, Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe Hamburg, Teilansicht; Foto: MKG Hamburg

Wie politisch ist Social Design?

Social Design, so der oft formulierte eigene Anspruch, will gesellschaftliche Missstände thematisieren und im Idealfall verändern. Deshalb versteht es sich als gesellschaftskritisch – und optimiert gleichzeitig das Bestehende. Was also ist die politische Dimension von Social Design – ist es Motor zur Veränderung oder trägt es zur Stabilisierung und Normalisierung bestehender Ungerechtigkeiten bei?